Archive for the A Phrase For Phriday Category

Phrase For Phriday

Posted in A Phrase For Phriday with tags , on August 27, 2010 by AF

These Phrases for Phriday (I hope) provide examples of how Brits and Americans (and other English speakers around the world) are often, as the saying goes, divided by a common language.

I’m not at all sure if these are solely British words and phrases. However, some of them sound pretty British to me – like they might be instances when those Americans and others I mentioned might be tempted to think, “WTF does that mean?”. But I’m providing nothing more here than my personal interpretation of the words in question. Of course, I could be wrong – nothing new there then, either!

~

Today’s phrase is…

Actually, I’ve included two phrases both involving “a little” of something and I suspect they will be well known to Americans and others. However…
 
“A little learning is a dangerous thing” – Alexander Pope (1709). A very good and accurate observation that is fairly self explanatory, but that I guess we would all do well to remember – just because we know a bit about a subject it often tends to make us think we are some kind of expert, but it doesn’t actually mean we know what we are talking about. Still, that doesn’t need to stop most of us, does it?
😆
 
The second is one of my favourites with which I can empathise and I’m sure everyone will get this without further explanation…
 
“A little of what you fancy does you good.” Yeah, baby!

Have a good weekend…  😉

Phrase For Phriday

Posted in A Phrase For Phriday with tags , on April 16, 2010 by AF

These (erratically sort of regular) Phrases for Phriday are something that I started a while ago in response to a suggestion from one of my readers, the lovely PJ. They (I hope) provide examples of how Brits and Americans (and other English speakers around the world) are often, as the saying goes, divided by a common language.

I’m not at all sure if these are particularly solely British words and phrases. However, I have to start somewhere and that means making some assumptions… they sound pretty British to me, or to put it another way, these are instances when I believe those Americans and others I mentioned might be tempted to think, “WTF does that mean?”. But I’m providing nothing more here than my personal interpretation of the words in question. Of course, I could be wrong – nothing new there then, either!

~

Today’s phrase is…

All my eye and Betty Martin. I have no idea where this comes from, but it means that you are calling what has been said – utter rubbish! I believe people in the US probably know the phrase “My eye!” as meaning much the same thing. Where, who, or what Betty Martin was, or how her name came into the picture in the 1800s in the UK, I have no idea. A current and apt UK example would be, “Oh, that’s all my eye and Betty Martin. Surely you don’t believe anything that guy says. He’s a politician for heavens sake!”

Have a good weekend…  😉

Phrase For Phriday

Posted in A Phrase For Phriday with tags , on March 12, 2010 by AF

These Phrases for Phriday are something that I started a while ago in response to a suggestion from one of my readers, the lovely PJ. They (I hope) provide examples of how Brits and Americans (and other English speakers around the world) are often, as the saying goes, divided by a common language.

I prefer to begin these light-hearted posts by admitting right here that I’m not at all sure if these are particularly solely British words and phrases. However, I have to start somewhere and that means making some assumptions… they sound pretty British to me, or to put it another way, these are instances when I believe those Americans and others I mentioned might be tempted to think, “WTF does that mean?”. But I’m providing nothing more here than my personal interpretation of the words in question. Of course, I could be wrong – nothing new there then, either!

~

It’s been a while since my last post on this, so today’s phrase is a whole paragraph…

I felt a right Hampton: She smiled and flashed her hampsteads and then kicked me in the khyber. Of course, I was pretty brahms at the time, or I wouldn’t have asked her for a butchers at her bristols. The thing is though, she’s got this gorgeous long red barnet and the sexiest green minces you’ve ever seen.

I guess you can figure it out if I tell you that it’s rhyming slang and…

Hampton = Hampton Wick = dick
Hampstead = Hampstead Heath = teeth
Khyber = Khyber Pass = arse (ass to our American cousins)
Brahms = Brahms and Liszt = pissed (drunk)
Butchers = Butcher’s hook = look
Bristols = Bristol Cities = titties (boobs)
Barnet = Barnet Fair = hair
and Minces = Mince Pies = eyes

Have a good weekend…  😉

Phrase For Phriday

Posted in A Phrase For Phriday with tags , , , on January 29, 2010 by AF

These Phrases for Phriday are something that I started a while ago in response to a suggestion from one of my readers, the lovely PJ. They (I hope) provide examples of how Brits and Americans (and other English speakers around the world) are often, as the saying goes, divided by a common language.

I prefer to begin these light-hearted posts by admitting right here that I’m not at all sure if these are particularly solely British words and phrases. However, I have to start somewhere and that means making some assumptions… they sound pretty British to me, or to put it another way, these are instances when I believe those Americans and others I mentioned might be tempted to think, “WTF does that mean?”. But I’m providing nothing more here than my personal interpretation of the words in question. Of course, I could be wrong – nothing new there then, either!

~

For today’s phrase, we’re back on the subject of Cockney Rhyming Slang. The phrase is… What a berk, which is a not very nice way of saying, “What an idiot!” However, most people who use it don’t understand the derivation, which is Cockney Rhyming slang – as in: What a Berk – Berkley Hunt and I’ll leave you to figure out the rhyme… Still, although I’ve never heard it, I suppose it might also be used in a more literal form when discussing a young woman with a fine pair of Bristols – Bristol Cities – er… titties (boobs) and her other attractions.

Don’t blame me for the innuendo – The Peach Tart is having a particularly smutty patch on her blog and it kinda got me thinking – ordinarily I never think about sex… Do you believe in fairies by the way?

 

Have a good weekend…  ; )

Phrase For Phriday

Posted in A Phrase For Phriday with tags , , on January 15, 2010 by AF

These Phrases for Phriday are something that I started a while ago in response to a suggestion from one of my readers, the lovely PJ. They (I hope) provide examples of how Brits and Americans (and other English speakers around the world) are often, as the saying goes, divided by a common language.

I prefer to begin these light-hearted posts by admitting right here that I’m not at all sure if these are particularly solely British words and phrases. However, I have to start somewhere and that means making some assumptions… they sound pretty British to me, or to put it another way, these are instances when I believe those Americans and others I mentioned might be tempted to think, “WTF does that mean?”. But I’m providing nothing more here than my personal interpretation of the words in question. Of course, I could be wrong – nothing new there then, either!

~

Today’s phrase is…

I wouldn’t touch it with a barge pole, which I guess is probably quite understandable to a lot of you, even though it’s an English expression. A barge pole is a ten foot or more long pole that was used to push barges along canals once upon a time and the phrase simply means that something is so undesirable to you that you don’t even want to get that close to it – such as modern banking and investment advice, or a political career perhaps…

An example might be, “He’s spent the last five years living it up in Thailand. I’m not touching it with a barge pole until I see the results of a medical!”

Have a good weekend… 😉

Phrase For Phriday

Posted in A Phrase For Phriday with tags on December 18, 2009 by AF

These Phrases for Phriday are something that I started a while ago in response to a suggestion from one of my readers, the lovely PJ. They (I hope) provide examples of how Brits and Americans (and other English speakers around the world) are often, as the saying goes, divided by a common language.

I prefer to begin these light-hearted posts by admitting right here that I’m not at all sure if these are particularly solely British words and phrases. However, I have to start somewhere and that means making some assumptions… they sound pretty British to me, or to put it another way, these are instances when I believe those Americans and others I mentioned might be tempted to think, “WTF does that mean?”. But I’m providing nothing more here than my personal interpretation of the words in question. Of course, I could be wrong – nothing new there then, either!

~

Today’s phrase is…

Would you Adam it? which is cockney rhyming slang. Cockney Rhyming Slang, although basically English is almost a language in it’s own right and, particularly when it’s spoken properly, is almost unintelligible to those who don’t know it. That’s because the actual rhyme is left off of the end to shorten it and make it harder for “outsiders” to comprehend. Thus, my phrase for today refers to the complete rhyme Would you Adam and Eve it? – would you believe it?

An example might be, “Would you Adam it, she took him right up the apples?” which completes as: would you Adam and Eve it, she took him right up the apples and pears? For the totally uninitiated that would translate as: would you believe it, she took him straight upstairs? (Sounds like my kind of girl!)

Have a good weekend…  😉

Phrase For Phriday

Posted in A Phrase For Phriday with tags , , on December 11, 2009 by AF

These Phrases for Phriday are something that I started a while ago in response to a suggestion from one of my readers, the lovely PJ. They (I hope) provide examples of how Brits and Americans (and other English speakers around the world) are often, as the saying goes, divided by a common language.

I prefer to begin these light-hearted posts by admitting right here that I’m not at all sure if these are particularly solely British words and phrases. However, I have to start somewhere and that means making some assumptions… they sound pretty British to me, or to put it another way, these are instances when I believe those Americans and others I mentioned might be tempted to think, “WTF does that mean?”. But I’m providing nothing more here than my personal interpretation of the words in question. Of course, I could be wrong – nothing new there then, either!

~

Today’s phrase is…

Follow me home… which is an expression of surprise. Perhaps an example of that might be if a very ordinary and somewhat older man perhaps made an outrageous sexual suggestion as a joke to a very attractive and sexy young female friend. He would no doubt be gobsmacked (is that another Brit phrase?) if, out of the blue, she said, “Okay. Your place or mine?” The astounded man might well respond with, “Well, follow me home!” In which case, if she didn’t understand his vernacular, he could end up with a very hard time back home trying to explain the presence of the young woman to his wife!

Have a good weekend…  😉

Phrase For Phriday

Posted in A Phrase For Phriday with tags , , on November 27, 2009 by AF

These Phrases for Phriday are something that I started a while ago in response to a suggestion from one of my readers, the lovely PJ. They (I hope) provide examples of how Brits and Americans (and other English speakers around the world) are often, as the saying goes, divided by a common language.

I prefer to begin these light-hearted posts by admitting right here that I’m not at all sure if these are particularly solely British words and phrases. However, I have to start somewhere and that means making some assumptions… they sound pretty British to me, or to put it another way, these are instances when I believe those Americans and others I mentioned might be tempted to think, “WTF does that mean?”. But I’m providing nothing more here than my personal interpretation of the words in question. Of course, I could be wrong – nothing new there then, either!

~

This is not only British, but it’s even a bit more specific than that – northern English – although most of us southerners understand it only too well and often use it, usually with a wry smile when we’ve failed to get what we foolishly hoped we might.

Today’s phrase is…

Owt for nowt… this means anything for nothing as in, “If you want it, you’ll have to pay for it! You don’t get owt for nowt in this world.”

Alternatively, male chauvinists like me might shrug our shoulders and say, “You can pay for sex, or you can get married,  but it’s all the same – either way, you don’t get owt for nowt.”

Have a good weekend…  😉

Phrase For Phriday

Posted in A Phrase For Phriday with tags , , , , , , , , on November 20, 2009 by AF

I missed last week, so I suppose I’d better make a bit of an effort to come up with something appropriate.

Accordingly, I thought I’d continue the theme of my last post – “Sex Is What It’s All About” – just to please anyone who might have been expecting a slightly greater degree of graphic detail in that post.

So…

  1. What about the phrase: A good seeing to…? Slang for having very satisfying sex – as in, “She gave him such a right good seeing to, he’s been asleep for the last twenty four hours.”
      
  2. Then there’s also the various names for the equipment involved. I’m sure that many of our words are the same as those in the US, but there are a couple that I think are rather different: there’s fanny… which I kind of imagine means butt in the States, since there are numerous references to guys sitting on their fanny. In the UK that same word means vagina, or more accurately, the whole female organ – the same as pussy, which may also be a UK term since it also means cat there. One can see the logic of that, though – soft, furry, likes being stroked and will disappear in an instant if you upset it; the vulva is probably the more correct term, if you prefer it (which I, personally, don’t).
     
  3. Whilst we’re on the subject, there’s also the US person’s name, Randy (both male and female I believe): in the UK it is also used for both male and female, but to describe a person’s mood – as in “God! When he (she) did that right in front of me, it made me feel so randy I wanted to strip off and have him (her) right there across the supermarket check-out!”

Have a good weekend…    😉

Phrase For Phriday

Posted in A Phrase For Phriday with tags , , on November 7, 2009 by AF

This time I’m a bit stuck. There were several phrases that I came across during the week for our Phrase For Phriday, but like the idiot that I am I didn’t make a note of them.

So, here I am and a bit stuck. If you want to accuse me of being lazy and not keeping the necessary records of thoughts and ideas when they crop up, I’d have to admit I’m guilty. Yup, guys, you’ve got me banged to rights on that one…

Hang on though… that’s it… that sounds pretty English to me.

OK then, my phrase this week is: Banged to rights… caught red handed… er, that’s not just English as well, is it? Well anyway. It means when the police (for instance) have all the evidence and your guilt is pretty much beyond dispute. As when the thief is caught leaving the premises with goods stolen from there and his fingerprints are all over the scene of the crime. The cop might say something quaint like, “OK, Joe. We’ve got you this time. You’re banged to rights.”

Have a good weekend…  🙂